Ten Diabetes Superfoods

April 11, 2012 at 12:30 pm 3 comments

It is important to work these foods into your individualized meal plan in appropriate portions.  The following foods are low glycemic index foods and are high in nutrients that are often lacking in the Western diet, including potassium, calcium, fiber, magnesium, and vitamins A (carotenoids), C, and E.  It is always best to achieve your daily nutrient needs through the diet and foods that you eat.

Beans
You have a variety of options to choose from (kidney, pinto, navy, or black beans).  These are very high in fiber and provide about 1/3 of your daily requirement in just a ½ cup and are also good sources of magnesium and potassium.

Beans are considered starchy vegetables, but a ½ cup provides as much protein as an ounce of meat without the saturated fat. You can use canned beans to save time, but be sure to drain and rinse them to get rid of as much sodium as possible.

Dark Green Leafy Vegetables
These foods are so low in calories and carbohydrates, you can’t eat too much.  Some to choose from include spinach, collard greens, and kale.

Citrus Fruit
Pick your favorites and get part of your daily dose of soluble fiber and vitamin C.  Some to choose from include grapefruit, oranges, lemons, and limes.

Sweet Potatoes
A starchy vegetable packed full of vitamin A and fiber. Try in place of regular potatoes for a lower glycemic index alternative.

Berries
They are all packed with antioxidants, vitamins and fiber. Make a parfait alternating the fruit with light, non-fat yogurt for a new favorite dessert.  Some to choose from include blueberries, strawberries, raspberries, and blackberries.

Tomatoes
The good news is that no matter how you like your tomatoes are a great source of vitamin C, iron, and vitamin E, whether pureed, raw, or in a sauce.

Fish High in Omega-3 Fatty Acids
Salmon is a popular choice in this category. Stay away from the breaded and deep fat fried variety… they don’t count in your goal of 6-9 ounces of fish per week.

Whole Grains
The germ and bran are the part of the whole grain that contains all the nutrients. These foods also provide magnesium, chromium, omega 3 fatty acids, and folate.  Some a, such as pearled barley and oatmeal, also provide fiber and potassium.  Processed grains, like white bread made from enriched wheat flour, do not give you these healthy benefits.

Nuts
Nuts are a great source of protein, but also provide healthy fats both of which can aid in managing your hunger. Other benefits are a dose of magnesium and fiber.

Some nuts and seeds, such as walnuts and flax seeds, also contain omega-3 fatty acids.

Fat-free Milk and Yogurt
Dairy products contain calcium which can help build strong bones and teeth. Some dairy products are also fortified with vitamin D.  The connection between vitamin D and good health is an emerging topic of research.

*Adapted from American Diabetes Association (www.diabetes.org)*

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Entry filed under: Diabetes, Diet/Nutrition, Health, Healthy Lifestyle. Tags: , , , .

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3 Comments Add your own

  • 1. suppspot  |  April 11, 2012 at 12:41 pm

    Reblogged this on supplementspot and commented:
    Targeted superfoods for our followers!

    Reply
  • 2. Jane Ross  |  April 11, 2012 at 5:20 pm

    Tthis tweet was great! Suggestive & informative for all diabetics including me. Very encouraging reminder for me to keep on Tracy with eating healthy.

    Reply
  • 3. DiabetesAmerica  |  April 12, 2012 at 8:47 am

    Thanks — be sure to keep checking back for more information on diabetes, nutrition, exercise and more!

    Reply

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